Friday, April 11, 2014

Coconut Crepes with Ceylon Pure Organic Coconut Products

Yum


I am sure most of you are familiar with January 1st (New Year's Day) and Chinese New Year celebrations, but have you heard of Sri Lankan Sinhala and Tamil New Year (Aluth Avurudda) that is celebrated in April?  This is a day that we eat many traditional Sri Lankan foods to celebrate.  The folks at Gourmet World Market asked me to try some wonderful  Sri Lankan products from Ceylon Pure.  These coconut and rice products are USDA organic, fairtrade and Non-GMO.  I was very excited to try the coconut flour especially since I have been trying to eat a low-carb diet the last few weeks.  I found a recipe for a coconut crepe and will give you fillings both savory and sweet to enjoy with them.  Make sure you check out my post on April 14th (the day we celebrate Sri Lankan New Year) for more traditional recipes.   


Ingredients:
6 large eggs
1 cup unsweetened coconut milk (or almond milk)
3 Tbsp coconut flour, sifted
2 tsp coconut oil, melted, plus 2 tbsp for the pan
1 tsp arrowroot powder
1/4 tsp sea salt
1/4 tsp turmeric powder (optional)

yields 10-12 crepes

Directions:
1. Whisk together the crepe ingredients in a bowl. Let sit for 10 minutes while the pan heats so the coconut flour can absorb the liquid, then whisk again.


2. Heat a crepe pan or enameled skilled over the medium-high heat.
3. Place 1 tablespoon of the coconut oil in the pan, swirling to coat the bottom and sides.
4. Pour ¼ cup of the batter into the hot pan, turning the pan in a circular motion with one hand so the batter spreads thinly around the pan. Alternatively, very quickly use a spatula to spread the batter. Fill any holes with a drop of batter, making sure the pan is fully covered.
5. Cook for 1 minute, until the edges start to lift. Gently work a spatula under the crepe and flip it over. Cook on the second side for 15 seconds and turn out onto a plate.
6. Continue with the remaining batter, stacking the crepes on the plate as you work. Add a little more oil to the pan after about every 3 to 4 crepes if they begin to stick.


recipe from Against All Grain: Delectable Paleo Recipes to Eat Well & Feel Great, by Danielle Walker



 
Crepes with Pani Pol (Sweet Coconut) 


Recipe for Deviled Onion Sambal
 
Some of the wonderful Ceylon Pure Products

Disclaimer: I was sent the above Ceylon Pure products to try out.  I was not financially compensated for this post.  All opinions are my own. 

To purchase these items, please go to www.gourmetworldmarket.com and click Ceylon Pure on the Vendor list.



Copyright: All recipes, content, and images (unless otherwise stated) are the sole property of Curry and Comfort. Please do not use without prior written consent. Unauthorized reproduction is strictly prohibited.

10 comments:

  1. Ramona, these crepes look so good! Coconut crepes must taste very good...I have to try them ASAP!

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  2. Oh my goodness! You come up with the most wonderful recipes. I love the sound of these crepes. I cannot even begin to imagine how wonderful they must taste. Also, I did not know that Sri Lanka celebrated New Year's in April. It is so fun learning about other cultures and I'm looking forward to learning more about traditional Sir Lankan recipes.

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  3. Oooooooo look at those fancy fabulous crepes! Coconut crepes would be AMAZING, for the Sri Lankan New Year or, you know, just every day. :)

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  4. I love these gorgeous crepes, coconut is refreshing and delicious :D

    Cheers
    Choc Chip Uru

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  5. I will have to try these on a day when Gabbi isn't here they look delicious!

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  6. Oh how I love making crepes, but I've never use coconut of any kind as an ingredient! I definitely will be making these!!!

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  7. Those crepes sound amazing!! Wow...come over to the low-carb side, Ramona. ;)

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  8. I love all things coconut. I have a package of coconut flour sitting in my pantry screaming to be used for these crepes.

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